"The Winging Area"

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Click here for winding a hackle

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Diagram 1
Lets continue with the beard, or hackle as itís sometimes known. Tie in a suitably sized blue cock hackle, the fibres should reach to the point of the hook, and wind on to three close touching turns. Draw the fibres back and tie off leaving a nice even area on the top of the hook for the wing. There are different techniques used in tying in materials such as beards.
   Diagram 1 shows a wound hackle drawn back. Another way would be to tie on a wound hackle as above and draw the fibres downwards and backwards,  trapping them with the thread when tying off, so that most of the fibres are lying on the underside of the hook. A third technique, is to take a bunch of fibres from a cock hackle, or a bunch of hair, and tie it on evenly across the underside of the hook. 
Diagram 2
Next we tie in a wing of brown squirrel tail reaching back to the ends of the golden crest as shown on drawing 2. Be sure not to use to much hair and to remove the short excess fibres from the base of the hairs. If you tie in too much hair the head of the fly becomes cumbersome and difficult to finish. The hair will be more likely too work loose and it makes the finished head bulky and unsightly. A visual impression is all we are trying to create and not a thing off great bulk. I mention this as itís a common mistake even with developed fly tyers.
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Diagram 3
Finally diagram 3 shows a Golden Pheasant Crest feather tied over the wing with the ends meeting the tail crest feather. The fly is completed with a whip finish and the head varnished two or three times to a fine gloss finish. This is not any particular pattern but it is in the style of a Hairy Mary or a Stoats Tail. The fly was built up using the most common elements and techniques in todays modern hairwing fly tying. Using these basic elements many different fly patterns can be produced. 

| Lesson 1 | Lesson 2 | Lesson 3 | Lesson 4 | Lesson 5 | Download eBook |

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